Kemmelberg (c) Jan D'Hondt - Westtoer

The area of Heuvelland is located in West Flanders and is known as ‘Land of Hills’, offering a mixture of First World War sites and memorials along with some relaxing leisure activities. In 1918 it was lost and regained during the last key battles of the First World War.

Learn about the Battle for Mount Kemmel

In this temporary exhibition, The Final Offensive, The Battle for Mount Kemmel the municipality of Heuvelland will focus on the last year of the war and the importance of the American contribution, both to the war in general and to the final Allied offensive. The fighting around Mount Kemmel was one of the most dramatic aspects of this last year. Since 1915, the hill had been used by the British as an observation post. Knowing that the Americans would soon arrive in force, in April 1918 the German army launched a last desperate offensive of their own, in the hope of turning the war in their favour. They captured Mount Kemmel, but with the help of the French Army any further breakthrough was prevented. By the end of August, the hill was back in Allied hands, thanks in part to the efforts of the Americans in one of their first major actions in Flanders. This tumultuous period will be highlighted in the visitors' centre through the use of film, previously unseen photographs and personal stories.

Heuvelland Visitor Centre from 21st April 2018 – 21 April 2019

Taste the wine of Heuvelland

As unusual as it may sound in the land of beer, Heuvelland is a wine region of some distinction. The excellence of the wine in this region is guaranteed by the award of the AOP Quality label. Peruse from a selection of different grapes: Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Kerner, Müller Thurgau, Siegerrebe, Regent and Solaris. Indulge yourself with a wine tasting experience at one of the many small vineyards, while enjoying views of the calm landscape that was once a battleground.

Explore the British Bunkers of Lettenberg

The Lettenberg bunkers are part of the much larger Kemmel Hill, one of the most important British observation points in the area. To capitalise on this strategic location, British tunnellers created a network of bunkers. Towards the end of 1916, British engineers and tunnellers started the evacuation of underground headquarters on the Kemmel Hill. After the war the bunkers were forgotten, but the headquarters have recently been restored, allowing visitors to visit the four rooms of these reinforced concrete bunkers. 

Walk through the Bayernwald Trenches

With its high ground ridge, the Bayernwald trenches were an important military position during the war – allowing for observation of the enemy trenches and acting as the last natural obstacle on the road to the coast. Being uphill, the trench was much easier to defend and artillery fire was more effective. For this reason, in 1914 the French army tried valiantly to capture this site, though the German army managed to control the outpost between 1914-1917 and turned it into an impregnatable fortress. Visitors can now visit restored trenches, four German bunkers and two listening shafts.

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