Dear Friend of Flanders,

In view of the COVID-19-situation, specific safety measures and additional restrictions are currently in place across Belgium. You will find more detailed information on following website. For the latest travel advice to our country, please consult your local authorities.

If you are travelling to Flanders, Brussels or elsewhere in Belgium for a duration of 48 hours or more, you will need to complete a Passenger Locator Form, within the 48 hours before your arrival in Belgium. 

Take good care of yourself and each other and keep it safe and healthy.  

We hope to welcome you again soon, with twice the heart, love and hospitality. 

Warm regards,
VISITFLANDERS.

Winter Landscape with a Bird Trap (c)KMSKB photo J

Pieter Bruegel is a bit of an enigma. We don’t know an awful lot about the man. But we do know his enormous artistic legacy. And frankly, that’s more than enough. If you look at his works, you’ll see an artist with great fascination for nature, humanity and humour. These are some of the reasons why he was considered one of the finest artists in his time and the forerunner of the Flemish Primitives. These three masterpieces are a testimony to his extraordinary talent.

The Fall of the Rebel Angels

The Fall of the Rebel Angels (c)KMSKB, photo J. Geleyns-Ro scan s

'The Fall of the Rebel Angels' is perhaps Bruegel's most literal representation of a world in complete turmoil. The work depicts the very first confrontation between good and evil, even before Adam and Eve’s fall from grace.

Collection: Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium
Copyright: ©KMSKB, photo: J. Geleyns / Ro scan

Mad Meg

Mad Meg © Museum Mayer van den Bergh, Antwerpen

It depicts bizarre ruins, monstrous creatures, people fighting, a scorching glow and a woman, wearing armour, brandishing a sword as she rushes forward. She is Mad Meg, of course, and in the farces in Bruegel’s era, her name was synonymous of a virago.

Collection: museum Mayer van den Bergh
Copyright: ©Museum Mayer van den Bergh, Antwerp

Winter Landscape with a Bird Trap

Winter Landscape with a Bird Trap (c)KMSKB, photo J. Geleyns-Ro scan

The painting depicts a winter landscape of a Brabant village and river, and is a predecessor of the 17th-century Dutch winter landscapes.

Collection: Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium
Copyright: ©KMSKB, photo: J. Geleyns / Ro scan

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